Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology

ISSN 2230-4398, Volume 15, Issue 1, 2011

Incorporating the NACCQ publications:
Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology, ISSN 1176-4120
Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology, ISSN 1174-0175

Issue Home  Home  Authors  Reviewers  About 
 
Box Invited Article I1:

Global intercultural collaboration: New educational directions in global collaborations between cultures

Tony Clear
Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
tony.clear@aut.ac.nz

Leo Hitchcock
Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
leo.hitchcock@aut.ac.nz

Anders Berglund
Uppsala University, Sweden
andersb@it.uu.se

Clear, T., Hitchcock, L., & Berglund A. (2011). Global intercultural collaboration: New educational directions in global collaborations between cultures. Journal of Applied Computing and Information Technology, 15(1). Retrieved May 23, 2019 from http://www.citrenz.ac.nz/jacit/JACIT1501/2011Clear_GlobalInterculturalCollaboration.html

Keywords

Global Intercultural Collaboration

In response to the globalization of computing, education has been argued as "a primary means for both developed and developing countries to mount a response to offshoring so their work forces can compete globally for IT jobs" (Vardi, 2010), and further:

Answering these calls, at Auckland University of Technology we have run workshops into global intercultural collaboration in both 2009 and 2010. In the first workshop reported in a special section of ACM Inroads the questions asked were:

The initial workshop on Global Intercultural Collaboration then, explored interdisciplinary dimensions of globalisation, collaboration and culture from 27 - 28 January, 2009, at Auckland University of Technology.

Extending that work this section presents two papers that emerged as a result of the second workshop on Global Intercultural Collaboration 2010 - Future Challenges and Opportunities held at Auckland University of Technology on the 4-5 February 2010. The workshop explored new directions in global collaborations between cultures, taking advantage of the presence in New Zealand of international Computer Science Education Researchers with extensive experience in Global Virtual Collaboration, and the participation of collaborators from partner institutions and programmes in the Asian region. The workshop aimed to continue and further an interdisciplinary conversation on the topic of culture in the context of global collaboration. Speakers from Australasian institutions and from languages and social sciences disciplines at AUT took part. The two papers presented here address educational initiatives aimed at building cross-cultural awareness in students.

The first article entitled "Reasoning about the Value of Cultural Awareness in International Collaboration" describes an action research intervention in an Open Ended Group Project Course between Uppsala University in Sweden and Rose Hulman Institute of Technology in Indiana. Cultural awareness seminars were introduced into the course initially for the Swedish students then for both groups. The paper draws some lessons for smaller countries such as New Zealand and Sweden and reflects on the success of the initiative and some planned future steps in the course.

The second article "Team Health, an assessment approach to engage first year students in cross-cultural and cross-discipline teams towards more effective team-working" focuses on strategies for developing cultural awareness that lead to better team outcomes. This paper set in an Australian University context poses the research question: "whether localised university settings can provide similar globalised intercultural experiences for computing students?"

A case study is presented of an introductory course in web design with three diverse disciplines (Communication Studies, Information Technology and Multimedia) and large student numbers, working in cross-disciplinary and cross-cultural team projects. Key attributes for cross cultural teamwork are identified and the positive impact of guided reflections is outlined, suggesting that the local can indeed be global.

Acknowledgements

We would also like to thank Ako Aotearoa (the National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence) , and Auckland University of Technology's Software Engineering Laboratory for their generous support in funding the second workshop, and express our appreciation to the reviewers for this special section.

References

Clear, T., Berglund, A., & Hitchcock, L. (2010). Special Section: Global Intercultural Collaboration - Overview. ACM Inroads, 1(3), 32-33.

Daniels, M., Cajander, Å., Pears, A., & Clear, T. (2010). Engineering Education Research in Practice: Evolving Use of Open Ended Group Projects as a Pedagogical Strategy for Developing Skills in Global Collaboration (Special issue on Applications of Engineering Education Research). International Journal of Engineering Education, 26(4), 795-806.

Vardi, M. (2010). Globalization and Offshoring of Software Revisited. Communications of the ACM, 53(5), 5.