Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology

04:01

July 2006

Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology.
Vol 4, Issue 1 (July 2006).
ISSN 1176-4120.

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Table of Contents

Current issue: BACIT 4(2) October 2006
A Special Issue on Postgraduate Research

Welcome to BACIT 4(2) - a special issue dedicated to postgraduate research.

  • Guest Editorial
    • PhD research: Building research culture and careers
      - Andy Connor and Judith Symonds
  • Invited: Views
    • Setting and maintaining an effective research agenda
      - John Hosking
  • Refereed Articles
    • A1. "Where are my glasses?": An object location system within the home
      - Parikshit Basrur and David Parry
    • A2. A comparison of inductive and transductive models for predicting the establishment potential of the exotic scale, Aspidiella hartii (Cockerell) in New Zealand
      - Snjezana Soltic and Lora Peacock
    • A3. Biologically realistic image processing and brain-like neural networks for visual pattern recognition
      - Simei Gomes Wysoski and Lubica Benuskova
    • A4. Auto-identification technologies: RFID vs barcode in the supply chain
      - Peter Karlsson and Judith Symonds
    • A5. A review of five years of instructional technology in New Zealand
      - Richard Collecutt, Robert Douglas, Don Mardle and Kay Fielden
  • Book Review
    • Slay, J. & Koronius, A. (2006), "Information technology security & risk management"
      - Rowena Sinclair

    We welcome contributions to BACIT. Read the submission guidelines and download a template here. more..

    For further information contact the Editors.

    Krassie Petrova (krassie.petrova@aut.ac.nz)
    Michael Verhaart (mverhaart@eit.ac.nz)


    Guest Editorial

    PhD Research: Building Research Culture and Careers

    Andy Connor (andy.connor@aut.ac.nz)
    Judith Symonds (judith.symonds@aut.ac.nz)
    Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    Students are often asked “What is Quality?” Academically, Quality can be defined in many ways: “conformance to requirements”, “degree of excellence”, or “of superior grade”. Quality can even be measured using simple metrics like the number of software defects per line of code. But does this really tell us what Quality is? No. Yet each and every one ...


    Invited: Views

    Setting and maintaining an effective research agenda

    John Hosking (j.hosking@auckland.ac.nz)

    Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    I find myself regularly in the position of advising young academics on how to develop their research careers. I was therefore delighted to have been invited to address the same issue at a recent conference of Auckland University of Technology postgraduate students embarking on their academic careers as it allowed me the opportunity to reflect on my own research career. This viewpoint article is the end result.


     Refereed Articles

    A1. "Where are my glasses?": An object location system within the home

    Parikshit Basrur and David Parry
    (dparry@aut.ac.nz)
    Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    “Assisted living” refers to technologies and techniques that support elderly or disabled people in their homes. The economic and social importance of such systems increases as the percentage of elderly people in the population grows. A common experience of aging is the difficulty of remembering where household objects are located.

    A2. A comparison of inductive and transductive models for predicting the establishment potential of the exotic scale, Aspidiella hartii (Cockerell) in New Zealand

    Snjezana Soltic (ssoltic@manukau.ac.nz)
    Lora Peacock (lora.peacock@maf.govt.nz)
    Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    The purpose of this investigation is to assess the applicability of transductive reasoning for building predictive models in environmental studies. We used inductive and transductive reasoning to prepare predictive models to assess the establishment potential of Aspidiella hartii (Cockerell), an insect pest of potential economic importance in New Zealand.

    A3. Biologically realistic image processing and brain-like neural networks for visual pattern recognition

    Simei Gomes Wysoski (swysoski@aut.ac.nz)
    Lubica Benuskova (lbenusko@aut.ac.nz)
    Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    A review of the basic concepts of biologically realistic neural networks when applied to visual pattern recognition, and a new and simple model for visual pattern recognition that adaptively learns by example through synaptic plasticity and changes in structure. The event driven approach optimizes processing speed in order to simulate networks with large number of neurons.

    A4. Auto-identification technologies: RFID vs barcode in the supply chain

    Peter Karlsson and Judith Symonds
    (judith.symonds@aut.ac.nz)
    Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    RFID technology is new to the public domain. It was initially developed in the 1930s by the British during World War II. RFID technology gained little interest in the business arena and as a result further development of the technology progressed at a slow pace. Because of this, RFID has been associated with high costs and is still considered a relatively immature technology.

    A5. A review of five years of instructional technology in New Zealand

    Richard Collecutt, Robert Douglas, Don Mardle and Kay Fielden
    (kfielden@unitec.ac.nz)
    Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    For this literature review 35 instructional technology research articles publishd in 2001-2006 were selected and then classified using the research method adopted, the education sector, and the topic domain within instructional technology. The majority of papers reviewed were from the tertiary sector, with 27 reporting on completed research.


    Book Review

    Slay, J. & Koronius, A. (2006),"Information technology security & risk management"

    Rowena Sinclair (rsinclai@aut.ac.nz) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

    This textbook was written to be used in undergraduate courses on information technology and e-business security. The authors address the business aspects and implications of information security rather than approach the topic from an in-depth techncial perspective. The book covers security technology and systems, risk management, legal and regulatory requirements, and other topics.


    Extended Editorial Board

    Editor Krassie Petrova, AUT University, New Zealand
    Web Editor Michael Verhaart, Eastern Institute of Technology, New Zealand
    Guest Editors Dr Andy Connor, AUT University, New Zealand
    Dr Judith Symonds, AUT University, New Zealand
    Members Tony Clear, AUT University, New Zealand
    Dr Donald Joyce, UNITEC, New Zealand
    Copy Editor Catriona Carruthers, AUT University, New Zealand
    Reviewers Dr David Parry, AUT University, New Zealand
    Gwyn Claxton, AUT University, New Zealand
    Dr Michael Defoin-Platel, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, France
    Dr Gordon Hunter, University of Lethbridge, Canada
    Kathryn McCallum, UUNZ Institute of Business, New Zealand
    Mike Lopez, Manukau University of Technology, New Zealand
    Dr Sue Worner, Lincoln University, New Zealand
    Dr Trevor Craig, Wollongong University College, New Zealand

    Copyright © 2006 NACCQ. Krassie Petrova, Michael Verhaart, Andy Connor and Judith Symonds (Eds.). An Open Access Journal, DOAJ # 11764120. Individual authors retain their intellectual property rights.