Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology

04:01

July 2006

Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology.
Vol 4, Issue 1 (July 2006).
ISSN 1176-4120.

home

about BACIT

 

Table of Contents

Welcome to BACIT 4(1), July 2006. In this issue:

  • Guest Editorial
    • Publishing through NACCQ
      - Donald Joyce
  • Views
    • Phenomenography as a way to research learning in computing
      - Anders Berglund
  • Refereed Articles
    • A1. eLearning education in ICT for a digital opportunities project
      - Chris McCarthy & Janne Ross
    • A2. The limitations of knowledge management and competitive advantage
      - David McLaughlin
    • A3. Culture awareness with email communication
      - Luke Johns Lau
    • A4. Managing information technology: A New Zealand literature review
      - Linda Hill, Michael Kaiser, Jochen Kaempfer, Evelyn Kurz & Kay Fielden
    • A5. Impact of user participation on consensus in group collaboration: An adaptive structuration perspective
      - Ridhima Mehra
  • Report
    • NACCQ - A national computing education organisation for the 21st century
      - Noel Bridgeman & Alison Young
  • From the Field
    • A workshop with Alice
      - Todd Cochrane
  • Book Review
    • Sarkar, N. I. (2006), 'Tools for teaching computer networking and hardware concepts'
      - Hira Sathu

We welcome contributions to BACIT. Read the submission guidelines and download a template here. more..

For further information contact the Editors.

Krassie Petrova (krassie.petrova@aut.ac.nz)
Michael Verhaart (mverhaart@eit.ac.nz)


Guest Editorial

Publishing through NACCQ

Donald Joyce (djoyce@unitec.ac.nz ) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

When NACCQ (The New Zealand National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications) members were surveyed eighteen months ago about NACCQ services (see the report by Bridgeman and Young in this issue), they rated the annual NACCQ conference as most important, followed by JACIT, the NACCQ Web site, and BACIT.


Views

Phenomenography as a way to research learning in computing

Anders Berglund (anders.berglund@it.uu.se)

Display as HTML Download PDF Version

In this article I argue that results of research in computer science education that use methodologies from pedagogy can enlighten us, as computer scientists, in our teaching - by demonstrating the kind of results that can be obtained by an empirical phenomenographic research approach. 


Refereed Articles

A1. eLearning education in ICT for a digital opportunities project

Chris McCarthy (mccarthycm@cpit.ac.nz)
Janne Ross (rossj@cpit.ac.nz)
Display as HTML Download PDF Version

This article documents, reflects on and reviews the initial set-up, preparation and start-up of the delivery of a beginners' diploma course (Diploma in Information and Communications Technology) to groups of students located in remote rural areas throughout New Zealand. 

A2. The limitations of knowledge management and competitive advantage

David McLaughlin (davmcl78@aut.ac.nz) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

Competitive advantage is an attribute that organisations strive for. The weapon of choice that many select is a Knowledge Management System - sadly enough, numerous of these implementations fail. The review investigates current research including the knowledge management paradigm, limitations, and acceptance. 

A3. Culture awareness with email communication

Luke Johns Lau (luke@smartech.net.nz) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

Cultural awareness about email communication is becoming more important than in the past, because many organizations and businesses are doing business activities in the global environment. A better understanding of culture (national, dynamic,community, organizational) could help organizations communicate better. 

A4. Managing information technology: A New Zealand literature review

Linda Hill, Michael Kaiser, Jochen Kaempfer, Evelyn Kurz & Kay Fielden (kfielden@unitec.ac.nz ) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

In this literature review the state of research in the Managing Information Technology (MIT) domain in New Zealand is explored. Emphasis has been placed on three areas: formal publication criteria for research papers (type of paper and publication type), research methodology, and research context. 

A5. Impact of user participation on consensus in group collaboration: An adaptive structuration perspective

Ridhima Mehra (ridmeh85@aut.ac.nz) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

Understanding how user participation influences consensus in group collaboration and how an information system influences this process, is receiving much attention currently. To study the potential link between user participation and group outcome, a modified version of the Adaptive Structuration Theory (AST) is used as a framework. 


Report

NACCQ - a national computing education organisation for the 21st century

Noel Bridgeman (nbridgeman@unitec.ac.nz)
Alison Young (ayoung@unitec.ac.nz )
Display as HTML Download PDF Version

This article describes and analyses a survey of the member institutions of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ), carried in late 2004 to gather information that could be drawn on to allow NACCQ to review its services with regard to the latest developments within the ICT and the tertiary education sectors. 


From the Field

A workshop with Alice

Todd Cochrane (todd.cochrane@weltec.ac.nz) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

The workshop with Alice 2.0 brought a number of polytechnic teachers out of their summer haze and into a alternate Universe in which computer programming is introduced to young children as a way to tell stories in 3D virtual worlds. Dr Barbara Boucher Owens lead a workshop on Alice and its potential as an instructional tool. 


Book Review

Sarkar, N. I. (2006), 'Tools for teaching computer networking and hardware concepts'

Hira Sathu (hsathu@unitec.ac.nz ) Display as HTML Download PDF Version
Published by IDEA Group Publishing, Hershey, PA, USA, Nurul Sarkar’s book provides the reader with a set of ready-made tools for teaching hardware concepts and computer networking. The range of tools covers both open source and commercial products, all of which are easily available. 

Editorial Board

Editor Krassie Petrova, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Web Editor Michael Verhaart, Eastern Institute of Technology, New Zealand
Guest Editor Dr Donald Joyce, UNITEC, New Zealand
Members Tony Clear, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Dr Donald Koh, UNITEC, New Zealand
Reviewers Diana Kassabova, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
John Jamieson, Eastern Institute of Technology, New Zealand
Roanne Birch, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Chooon-Tuck Kwan, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Leo Hitchcock, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Copy Editor Catriona Carruthers, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Copyright © 2006 NACCQ. Krassie Petrova, Michael Verhaart & Donald Joyce (Eds.). An Open Access Journal, DOAJ # 11764120. Individual authors retain their intellectual property rights.