Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology

02:02

June 2004

Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology.
Vol 2, Issue 2 (June 2004).
ISSN 1176-4120.

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Table of Contents

Welcome to BACIT 2(2). In this issue:

  • Editorial
    • SoDIS and IT education
      - Roger McHaney
  • Views
    • When too much Is not enough
      - Michael Goldweber
  • Special Issue - SoDIS SEPIA
    • Reflections on the Third SoDIS SEPIA Symposium
      - Tony Clear & Donald Gotterbarn
    • A Business case for SoDIS
      - Roger McHaney
    • SoDIS in London
      - Lesley Smith
    • SoDIS, scenarios and 'project success'
      - Linda Way & Noel Bridgeman
  • Information Technology Education
    • Using cegree courses to build industry relationships
      - Stephen Corich & Allister McLay
    • The Quality of service paradigm as the focus of net-centric computing: A postgraduate course
      - Krassie Petrova, Nurul Sarkar & Jim Buchan
    • What do online learners really do, and where and when do they do it?
      - David Parry

We welcome contributions to BACIT. Read the submission guidelines and download a template here. more..

For further information contact the Editors.

Krassie Petrova (krassie.petrova@aut.ac.nz )
Michael Verhaart (mverhaart@eit.ac.nz )


Editorial

SoDIS and IT education

Dr Roger McHaney  (mchaney@ksu.edu) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

I was fortunate to have spent a year at Auckland University of Technology from July, 2002 until July, 2003 while on sabbatical from Kansas State University. During that time I became aware of the growing New Zealand IT research infrastructure and its education system with much to offer in a number of interesting areas.


Views

When too much is not enough

Dr Michael Goldweber (mikeyg@cerebro.cs.xu.edu ) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

I had the opportunity to spend the latter half of 2003 at Auckland, New Zealand's UNITEC Institute of Technology as a visiting lecturer. As a dyed-in-the-wool computer scientist it was deemed best if I lectured in two of UNITEC's programming courses. The experience was both intellectually rewarding and scenically beautiful.


Special Issue : Third SoDIS SEPIA Symposium

Reflections on the Third SoDIS SEPIA Symposium

Tony Clear (tony.clear@aut.ac.nz)
Dr Donald Gotterbarn (donald.gotterbarn@aut.ac.nz)
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This paper briefly reports the authors’ reflections upon the third SoDIS SEPIA symposium held in Auckland on 5 December 2003. This event represented the third bi-annual meeting of members of the Software Engineering Practice Improvement Alliance (SEPIA), a research collaboration between New Zealand, US and Australian researchers, educators and practitioners involved in developing and promulgating the concept of Software Development Impact Statements.

A business case for SoDIS

Dr Roger McHaney  (mchaney@ksu.edu) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

An applied risk analysis methodology called a software development impact statement or SoDIS is increasingly becoming accepted as a rigorous mechanism for qualitatively identifying the problems and shortfalls associated with software development projects and resulting applications. This methodology has been imbedded in a software package known by the name SoDIS Project Auditor. One of the challenges SoDIS faces is an economic justification for expenditures associated with conducting an analysis.

SoDIS in London

Lesley Smith (lsmith@tekotago.ac.nz) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

In November 2003, an opportunity arose to present SoDIS to a group of medical researchers at the Royal Free Hospital in London. This article provides some background to the presentation and a brief discussion of the event and its outcomes.

SoDIS, scenarios and 'project success'

Linda Way (l.way@witt.ac.nz)
Dr Noel Bridgeman (n.bridgeman@witt.ac.nz )
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This paper reports on an investigation into the means required to incorporate the SoDIS methodology and software into the Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki (WITT) Information System’s project management curriculum. The first phase of the investigation consisted of examining the steps involved in both the ‘Project Success’ life cycle and the SoDIS methodology in order to determine the “best fit” for integration of the two processes.


Information Technology Education

Using degree courses to build industry relationships

Stephen Corich (scorich@eit.ac.nz)
Allister McLay (amclay@eit.ac.nz)
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In 2002 the Eastern Institute of Technology (EIT) Hawke’s Bay decided to build a purpose built information technology suite and at the same time upgrade its existing internal network infrastructure. As a result of the subsequent tendering process Allied Telesyn was identified as the preferred provider of networking hardware. This paper traces the ongoing relationships and explores the opportunities to build meaningful industry connections.

The quality of service paradigm as the focus of net-centric computing: A postgraduate course

Krassie Petrova (krassie.petrova@aut.ac.nz)
Nurul Sarkar (nurul.sarkar@aut.ac.nz)
Jim Buchan  (jim.buchan@aut.ac.nz)
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In the past three years a new postgraduate elective course on Net-centric computing was developed for a Master’s degree in Information Technology. The course evolved around the core subject topics included in the Computer Science body of knowledge as suggested by the IEEE Computer Society/ACM Task Force in the Computing Curricula 2001 report, with a strong emphasis on the relationship between networking technology and the applications delivered in a global networked environment.

What do online learners really do, and where and when do they do it?

David Parry (dave.parry@aut.ac.nz) Display as HTML Download PDF Version

Since 1999 The Business Faculty at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) has been using an online learning tool Business on-Line (BOL). The focus of this paper is the semester 1 (2002) period when the system was used by over 90 staff and 1,400 students. This paper describes some of the information available on the time and location of access to the system by students and staff. Some of the results show a large difference in access patterns by students and staff.


Editorial Board

Editor Krassie Petrova, Auckland University of Technology
Guest editor Roger McHaney, Kansas State University (U.S.A.)
Extended Editorial Panel Dr Donald Joyce, UNITEC
Dr Samuel Mann, Otago Polytechnic
David Parry, Auckland University of Technology
Andy Williamson, Wairua Consulting
Web Editor Michael Verhaart, Eastern Institute of Technology

Copyright 2004 - 2009 NACCQ. Krassie Petrova and Roger McHaney (Eds.). An Open Access Journal, DOAJ # 11764120. Individual authors retain their intellectual property rights.